0 $0.00

You have no items in your shopping cart.

Eau De Cartier Zeste De Soleil 3.4 Oz Edt For Unisex - EAUDCZDS34SU

- Eau De Cartier Zeste De Soleil 3.4 Oz Edt For Unisex - EAUDCZDS34SU

SKU: 3432240032515

Availability: Out of stock

List Price: $94.00

Today: $51.70

Overview
Product Details

Eau De Cartier Zeste De Soleil 3.4 Oz Edt For Unisex - EAUDCZDS34SU

3432240032515

3432240032515

EDT. Eau de Toilette

Cartier

N/A

N/A

N/A

Q&A

Product Q&A: Ask a question

Enter your question below

Subscribe to responses to this question

Submit

Be the first to ask a question about this product

Answers

I want to buy a perfume for concentration, which will be better?

Perfume types reflect the concentration of aromatic compounds in a solvent, which in fine fragrance is typically ethanol or a mix of water and ethanol. Various sources differ considerably in the definitions of perfume types. The intensity and longevity of a perfume is based on the concentration, intensity and longevity of the aromatic compounds (natural essential oils / perfume oils) used: As the percentage of aromatic compounds increases, so does the intensity and longevity of the scent created. Specific terms are used to describe a fragrance’s approximate concentration by percent/volume of perfume oil, which are typically vague or imprecise. A list of common terms (Perfume-Classi-fication) is as follows:

 

  • Perfume extract, or simply perfume (extrait): 15-40% (IFRA: typical 20%) aromatic compounds
  • Esprit de Parfum (ESdP): 15-30% aromatic compounds, a seldom used strength concentration in between EdP and perfume
  • Eau de Parfum (EdP), Parfum de Toilette (PdT): 10-20% (typical ~15%) aromatic compounds, sometimes listed as “eau de perfume” or “millésime.” Parfum de Toilette is a less common term that is generally analogous to Eau de Parfum.
  • Eau de Toilette (EdT): 5-15% (typical ~10%) aromatic compounds.
  • Eau de Cologne (EdC): Chypre citrus type perfumes with 3-8% (typical ~5%) aromatic compounds. “Original Eau de Cologne” is a registered trademark.
  • Perfume mist: 3-8% aromatic compounds (typical non-alcohol solvent)
  • Splash (EdS) and aftershave: 1-3% aromatic compounds. “EdS” is a registered trademark.

A “Classical cologne” describes men’s and women’s fragrances “which are basically citrus blends and do not have a perfume parent”.Classical colognes are different from
modern colognes, where the fragrance is typically a lighter, less concentrated interpretation of a perfume. Men’s colognes are also different from women’s colognes. Men’s
colognes have a similar concentration to eau de toilette, eau de parfum, “and in some instances perfume”; women’s colognes, on the other hand, are often the lightest con-
centration from a line of women’s fragrance products.

What Is Solvent Extraction?

Perfume oils are often diluted with a solvent, though this is not always the case, and its necessity is disputed. By far the most common solvent for perfume oil dilution is ethanol or a mixture of ethanol and water. Perfume oil can also be diluted by means of neutral-smelling oils such as fractionated coconut oil, or liquid waxes such as jojoba oil.

Why, do I find Imprecise terminology about perfumes?

Although quite often Eau de Parfum (EdP) will be more concentrated than Eau de Toilette (EdT) and in turn Eau de Cologne (EdC), this is not always the case. Different perfumeries or perfume houses assign different amounts of oils to each of their perfumes. Therefore, although the oil concentration of a perfume in EdP dilution will necessarily be higher than the same perfume in EdT from within the same range, the actual amounts can vary between perfume houses. An EdT from one house may be stronger than an EdP from another

Men’s fragrances are rarely sold as EdP or perfume extracts; equally so, women’s fragrances are rarely sold in EdC concentrations. Although this gender specific naming trend is common for assigning fragrance concentrations, it does not directly have anything to do with whether a fragrance was intended for men or women. Furthermore, some fragrances with the same product name but having a different concentration name may not only differ in their dilutions, but actually use different perfume oil mixtures altogether. For instance, in order to make the EdT version of a fragrance brighter and fresher than its EdP, the EdT oil may be “tweaked” to contain slightly more top notes or fewer base notes. In some cases, words such as extrême, intense, or concentrée that might indicate aromatic concentration are actually completely different fragrances, related only because of a similar perfume accord. An example of this is Chanel’s Pour Monsieur and Pour Monsieur Concentrée.

Eau de Cologne (EdC) since 1706 in Cologne, Germany, is originally a specific fragrance and trademark. However outside of Germany the term has become generic for Chypre citrus perfumes (without base-notes). EdS (since 1993) is a new perfume class and a registered trademark.

How and Where to Apply Perfume?

The conventional application of pure perfume (parfum extrait) in Western cultures is at pulse points, such as behind the ears, the nape of the neck, and the insides of wrists, elbows and knees, so that the pulse point will warm the perfume and release fragrance continually. The modern perfume industry encourages the practice of layering fragrance so that it is released in different intensities depending upon the time of the day. Lightly scented products such as bath oil, shower gel, and body lotion are recommended for the morning; eau de toilette is suggested for the afternoon; and perfume applied to the pulse points for evening. Cologne fragrance is released rapidly, lasting around 2 hours. Eau de toilette lasts from 2 to 4 hours, while perfume may last up to six hours.

A variety of factors can influence how fragrance interacts with the wearer’s own physiology and affect the perception of the fragrance. Diet is one factor, as eating spicy and fatty foods can increase the intensity of a fragrance.[11] The use of medications can also impact the character of a fragrance. The relative dryness of the wearer’s skin is important, since dry skin will not hold fragrance as long as skin with more oil.

How to describe a perfume?

The precise formula of commercial perfumes are kept secret. Even if they were widely published, they would be dominated by such complex ingredients and odorants that they would be of little use in providing a guide to the general consumer in description of the experience of a scent. Nonetheless, connoisseurs of perfume can become extremely skillful at identifying components and origins of scents in the same manner as wine experts.

The most practical way to start describing a perfume is according to the elements of the fragrance notes of the scent or the “family” it belongs to, all of which affect the overall impression of a perfume from first application to the last lingering hint of scent.

Tell me about Fragance Notes.

Perfume is described in a musical metaphor as having three sets of notes, making the harmonious scent accord. The notes unfold over time, with the immediate impression of the top note leading to the deeper middle notes, and the base notes gradually appearing as the final stage. These notes are created carefully with knowledge of the evaporation process of the perfume.

Top notes: The scents that are perceived immediately on application of a perfume. Top notes consist of small, light molecules that evaporate quickly. They form a person’s initial impression of a perfume and thus are very important in the selling of a perfume. Also called the head notes. Middle notes: The scent of a perfume that emerges just prior to when the top notes dissipate. The middle note compounds form the “heart” or main body of a perfume and act to mask the often unpleasant initial impression of base notes, which become more pleasant with time. They are also called the heart notes. Base notes: The scent of a perfume that appears close to the departure of the middle notes. The base and middle notes together are the main theme of a perfume. Base notes bring depth and solidity to a perfume. Compounds of this class of scents are typically rich and “deep” and are usually not perceived until 30 minutes after application. The scents in the top and middle notes are influenced by the base notes, as well the scents of the base notes will be altered by the type of fragrance materials used as middle notes. Manufacturers of perfumes usually publish perfume notes and typically they present it as fragrance pyramid, with the components listed in imaginative and abstract terms.

What are the favourite olfactive family?

Grouping perfumes, like any taxonomy, can never be a completely objective or final process. Many fragrances contain aspects of different families. Even a perfume designated as “single flower”, however subtle, will have undertones of other aromatics. “True” unitary scents can rarely be found in perfumes as it requires the perfume to exist only as a singular aromatic material.

Classification by olfactive family is a starting point for a description of a perfume, but it cannot by itself denote the specific characteristic of that perfume.

Traditional

The traditional classification which emerged around 1900 comprised the following categories:

Single Floral: Fragrances that are dominated by a scent from one particular flower; in French called a soliflore. (e.g. Serge Lutens’ Sa Majeste La Rose, which is dom- inated by rose.)

Floral Bouquet: Is a combination of fragrance of several flowers in a perfume compound. Examples include Quelques Fleurs by Houbigant and Joy by Jean Patou

Wood: Fragrances that are dominated by woody scents, typically of agarwood, sandalwood and cedarwood. Patchouli, with its camphoraceous smell, is commonly found in these perfumes. A traditional example here would be Myrurgia’s Maderas De Oriente or Chanel Bois-des-Îles. A modern example would be Balenciaga Rumba.

Leather: A family of fragrances which features the scents of honey, tobacco, wood and wood tars in its middle or base notes and a scent that alludes to leather. Traditional examples include Robert Piguet’s Bandit and Balmain’s Jolie Madame.

Chypre: Meaning Cyprus in French, this includes fragrances built on a similar accord consisting of bergamot, oakmoss, patchouli, and labdanum. This family of fragrances is named after a perfume by François Coty, and one of the most famous examples is Guerlain’s Mitsouko.

Fougère: Meaning Fern in French, built on a base of lavender, coumarin and oakmoss. Houbigant’s Fougère Royale pioneered the use of this base. Many men’s fragrances belong to this family of fragrances, which is characterized by its sharp herbaceous and woody scent. Some well-known modern fougères are Fabergé Brut and Guy Laroche Drakkar Noir.

Modern

Since 1945, due to great advances in the technology of perfume creation (i.e., compound design and synthesis) as well as the natural development of styles and tastes, new categories have emerged to describe modern scents:

Bright Floral: combining the traditional Single Floral & Floral Bouquet categories. A good example would be Estée Lauder’s Beautiful.

Green: a lighter and more modern interpretation of the Chypre type, with pronounced cut grass, crushed green leaf and cucumber-like scents. Examples include Estée Lauder’s Aliage, Sisley’s Eau de Campagne, and Calvin Klein’s Eternity.

Aquatic, Oceanic, or Ozonic: he newest category in perfume history, first appearing in 1988 Davidoff Cool Water (1988), Christian Dior’s Dune (1991), and many others. A clean smell reminiscent of the ocean, leading to many of the modern androgynous perfumes. Generally contains calone, a synthetic scent discovered in 1966, or other more recent synthetics. Also used to accent floral, oriental, and woody fragrances.

Citrus: An old fragrance family that until recently consisted mainly of “freshening” eau de colognes, due to the low tenacity of citrus scents. Development of newer fragrance compounds has allowed for the creation of primarily citrus fragrances. A good example here would be Faberge Brut.

Fruity: Featuring the aromas of fruits other than citrus, such as peach, cassis (black currant), mango, passion fruit, and others. A modern example here would be Ginestet Botrytis.

Gourmand: scents with “edible” or “dessert”-like qualities. These often contain notes like vanilla, tonka bean and coumarin, as well as synthetic components designed to resemble food flavors. A sweet example is Thierry Mugler’s Angel. A savory example would be Dinner by BoBo, which has cumin and curry hints.

Designer
The house of Cartier was founded in 1847 by Louis-Francois Cartier. Celebrated for s beautiful jewelry and attention to detail, the company's reputation grew over the late 1800's, wh the assistance of Cartier's son Alfred and grandsons Louis, Pierre and Jacques. Cartier gained notoriety in 1904 when Louis Cartier created the first wristwatch for aviator Alberto Santos-Dumont. This famous timepiece was known as the 'Santos.' Crowned heads and aristocrats around the world flocked to Cartier for their jewelry and watches throughout the 20th century. Family ownership of the business ended in 1964, but the company continued to expand s business and reputation wh boutiques around the world. The brand's offerings expanded to include leather goods, pens and scarves in the 1970s, and the first fragrancesヒᄄᆱヒᄄᆱ_Must de Cartier for women and Santos de Cartier for menヒᄄᆱヒᄄᆱ_were introduced in 1981. Cartier has launched a series of successful fragrances over the years, many bearing the same names as the company's jewelry collections and timepieces.
Shipping & Returns

Pygmaleon Shipping methods: US and Canadá:

We offer FREE standard shipping on all U.S. orders over $70 excluding International Orders (see below). U.S. orders less than $70 will be subject to a standard flat rate of $5.95 per order first product, plus $2.00 additional products.

Expected Delivery Time: 

All items will be shipped on average of 24-48 business hours from the time that the order is placed. Therefore most orders should be received within 4-8 business days via USPS, UPS or Federal Express from the time that you place your order placed. Should any expected delay outside this range occur, we may contact you through email and/or phone. If an item or part of your order is currently not in stock, we will contact you.



Available services for international deliveries (Only selective countries).

TransExpress Economy e-Commerce Delivery (Importer on behalf of our International customers)

Your international imports including hazmats (perfumes) will take 8-19 business days to  Colombia, Dominican Republic, and Costa Rica; 8-25 days to Ecuador and Panamá

If your packages do not include hazmats your packages will be delivered between 8-12 business days.



Delay/loss/damages/vandalism in shipping

If your package is missing, late or arrives with damages, please follow this procedure:
If your order has more than one tracking number, check with the carriers in charge (USPS, TransExpress) that your order is in the shipping route. Every tracking number represents a package. To understand why some shipments may have more than one number, keep in mind that some shipments may come from different fulfillment centers, or because these shipments may have an international destination to such country as Colombia, Costa Rica, Chile, Republica Dominicana, Ecuador, El Salvador, Panama, Costa Rica. If your packages had being shipped already, please contact us in [email protected] 


Status of an existing order

Tracking information will be automatically emailed once your order is packaged and shipped. Additionally, customers who placed an order using their registered account may view their Order Status On-line at any time. If you have not received a tracking number for your order within 3 days of submitting your order, please let us know by using our contact us page. Be sure to check your bulk email folders in case your email provider mistakenly filtered the tracking notification email.


Which warehouse has being shipped my package?

Once your package has been shipped you will receive an e-mail alerting you of the address of the location that shipped your product and the confirmation of the order number. If the warehouse is not listed you can see it in the tracking of your package. In International Shipping sent from Miami to countries such as Colombia, Costa Rica, Chile, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Trinidad Tobago y Venezuela, the warehouse is located in our headquarters in Miami, although the origin of the shipment within the U.S. may have come from different fulfillment centers.


At Pygmaleon we make our best efforts to dispatch from the nearest fulfillment center that has the product of your choice. The Pygmaleon operations center is located in Miami, Florida USA. Every supplier associated with our network has different warehouses and shipping centers in different parts of the country.


Why is my favorite carrier is not listed in the checkout?

Shipping methods are based on two options: the products you purchase and the destination address. Pygmaleon presents only checkout, shipping methods that apply to your purchase. So you will conduct a fair and appropriate choice. Some products that you buy may be shipped in a certain way and in a specific time of delivery, eg: Perfumes may require specialized transport because they are considered hazmat or dangerous. Some addresses can be reached using only certain shipping methods, eg. Puerto Rico.

Product's Review

Write Your Own Review

You're reviewing: Eau De Cartier Zeste De Soleil 3.4 Oz Edt For Unisex - EAUDCZDS34SU

CMS tab

You may also be interested in the following product(s)